Tuesday, February 5, 2019

Oasis Conference Center, Loveland OH 45140

Registration Opens Early December


In case of inclement weather, check the event website for conference updates.

Conference Brochure

Online Registration Website

Registration Form (if registering by mail)

Registration Information

Registration includes a continental breakfast, buffet lunch and a USB memory stick containing all of the available handouts.

Registration Cost: $50

Registration deadline is February 1, 2019

New for 2019: Space limited to 75 registrants. Register early to avoid being shut out.

No walk-ins permitted. Sorry but no refunds will be given for this conference. We have to pay for your food whether you show up or not. If you are unable to attend after registering, we will mail your USB memory stick containing the handouts to you after the conference.

How to Register

Online (preferred method) 

  • Fast & easy.
  • Pay with your credit card.
  • Receive an emailed confirmation that you are registered for the conference.
  • Click the online registration website link to register for this conference.

By Mail

  • Print off a registration form.
  • Make your check payable to OSU Extension.
  • Mail your registration and check to:

Ohio State University Extension

Warren County 320 E. Silver Street Lebanon, OH 45036

No confirmation will be sent to you, if you register by mail. Contact the Warren County Extension office if you have questions about your registration.

Class Descriptions

Session #1: 9:00 a.m. to 10:00 a.m.

1A - Foliar or Soil Fertilizers for Specialty Crops: Which is best? - Brad Bergefurd - Ohio State University Extension Educator, Scioto County & OSU South Centers

Is a foliar or soil applied fertilizer best for your farm? This class will cover the benefits of both fertilizer programs, what situations each should be implemented, and how each type of program should be managed for fruit and vegetable production.  1 Hour Recertification Credit – Fertilizer

1B - Managing Spotted Wing Drosophila with Emphasis on Exclusion Netting - Jim Jasinski – Ohio State University Extension, IPM Program Manager

This invasive insect has been a key pest of small fruit, peaches and grapes since it’s discovery in Ohio in 2011.  While growers have had to either adapt to new management practices such as spraying insecticides once the flies are found on their farm or live with a smaller window of damage free fruit harvest if they choose not to spray or abandon growing some types of small fruit altogether, some new perspectives on managing these pests using exclusion insect netting are now being investigated. Information from other states who have conducted these research and demonstration projects will be discussed, as well as some hands-on demonstration and tips on how to build and use these insect exclusion frames.

1C - How Healthy Are Your Farm’s Finances? - Greg Meyer – Ohio State University Extension Educator, Warren County

What’s a balance sheet and how is it calculated? What the difference between liquidity and solvency? How do I know if my debt to equity ratio is good? During this session, Greg will discuss issues related to your farm’s finances, including a brief overview of how they are calculated and what the numbers really mean for your farm’s financial health.

 

Session #2: 10:15 a.m. to 11:15 a.m.

2A - Pumpkin Production Systems with Emphasis on Using Cover Crops - Jim Jasinski – Ohio State University Extension, IPM Program Manager

Much research and demonstration work has been conducted with cover crops over the years at OSU and other land grant universities.  This presentation will serve to cover some of the basic reasons why cover crops might be a good fit for your operation, and at the same time look at some different combinations of cover crops which might serve different functions in your operation, such as soil building and microbial/biological activity enhancement.

2B - Emerging Orchard Pest Problems and Their Management - Dr. Celeste Welty – The Ohio State University, Associate Professor, Department of Entomology

Last year, many orchards had trouble with potato leafhopper, San Jose scale, and stink bugs. We will discuss how these pests can be monitored, and which insecticide products and which timing of sprays will provide the best control of these pests. A potential new pest called the spotted lanternfly will be discussed. 1 Hour Recertification Credit – Category 3            

2C - Avoiding Mistakes on Small Acreage Spray Applications - Greg Meyer – Ohio State University Extension Educator, Warren County

Inaccurate measurement of pesticides can affect performance. Too little may fail to control the pest and can lead to resistance problems. Too much violates state and federal laws and can injure crops and lead to carryover problems. In either case, inaccurate measurements waste money. During this session, Greg Meyer will discuss how to avoid making some common mistakes when measuring and mixing pesticides. This session will include information how to convert large acreage recommendations into small area applications. 1 Hour Recertification Credit - Core

 

Session #3: 11:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.

3A - Management of the Mildews and Bacterial Diseases in Cucurbit Crops - Dr. Sally Miller – The Ohio State University, Professor, Department of Plant Pathology

Downy mildew, powdery mildew and bacterial diseases have become very important issues in cucurbit crop management, reducing crop yield and quality.  In southern Ohio, downy mildew tends to be a problem in pumpkins and squashes initially, but can also be serious in cucumbers and melons.  Powdery mildew is a perennial problem and must be controlled in pumpkins, squash and melons to assure adequate fruit yields.  Bacterial diseases, particularly angular leaf spot and bacterial spot, are very difficult to manage under rainy conditions; preventative approaches are needed. An unusual bacterial fruit rot observed in pumpkins and squash in the fall of 2018 will also be described. Fungicide and bactericide resistance is a problem for these diseases and must be managed. Integrated management practices including seed sanitation and deployment of disease resistant varieties, cultural tactics, and fungicides, bactericides and biologicals will be presented. 1 Hour Recertification Credit – Category 3 

3B - Apple Fruit Rot Diseases - Dr. Melanie Ivey – The Ohio State University, Assistant Professor, Department of Plant Pathology

Fungal fruit rots of apple can reduce the quality and marketability of apples in the field and during storage.  Three fungal rots that commonly occur on apples are black rot, bitter rot, and white rot. Good orchard and tree sanitation and fungicides applied from first cover until harvest on a 2-week schedule are generally effective.  However, changes in our weather patterns (more rain, higher temperatures), fungicide resistance and new varieties that are susceptible to fruit rots has led to an increase in rot incidence and severity.  Management practices to overcome these challenges will be discussed.

1 Hour Recertification Credit – Category 3 

3C - Keys to Manage Insecticide Rotations and Integrated Pest Management on High Tunnels - Dr. Luis Canas – The Ohio State University, Associate Professor, Department of Entomology

In this session Dr. Canas will explain in detail the importance of a strong insecticide rotation that complements an IPM program for management of insects and mites damaging plants in high tunnels. Details will include insecticide mode of action, how to develop your own rotations, and sources of information regarding appropriate use of insecticides in high tunnels. Dr. Canas will discuss his most recent evaluations of new molecules used to control insects and mites.

1 Hour Recertification Credit – Category 5

 

Session #4: 1:30 p.m. to 2:30 p.m.

4A - Tomato and Pepper Disease Management - Dr. Sally Miller – The Ohio State University, Professor, Department of Plant Pathology

Important diseases of peppers and tomatoes in open field production, as well as tomatoes in high tunnels, will be described.  Bacterial diseases such as bacterial spot, speck and canker, fungal diseases such as Septoria blight, early blight, soil borne diseases, and anthracnose, and Phytophthora blight, viruses and root knot nematodes will be highlighted.  All of these diseases are best managed by deploying a suite of management tactics.  Integrated management practices including seed sanitation and use of disease resistant varieties, cultural tactics including anaerobic soil disinfestation and others, and fungicides, bactericides and biologicals will be presented.

1 Hour Recertification Credit – Category 3 

4B - Commercial Pawpaw Production in Ohio: Can it be profitable? - Brad Bergefurd - Ohio State University Extension Educator, Scioto County & OSU South Centers                    

This session will provide attendees with basic knowledge needed to successfully plan, establish and manage a commercial pawpaw orchards and  some of the market opportunities that exist for this native fruit.  

4C - Biological Control to Manage Insects in High Tunnels: How to Develop a Program That Fits Your Needs - Dr. Luis Canas – The Ohio State University, Associate Professor, Department of Entomology

In this session Dr. Canas will explain how to develop your own biological control program in high tunnels. He will include information about selection of biological control agent, vendor selection, and quality control assessment. He will provide specific examples of biological control programs that have worked against insects such as thrips, aphids, and whiteflies. He will also discuss compatibility of some biological control agents with some insecticides and biopesticides.

1 Hour Recertification Credit – Category 5

Session #5: 2:45 p.m. to 3:45 p.m.

5A - Managing Corn Earworm and Other Worms in Sweet Corn - Dr. Celeste Welty – The Ohio State University, Associate Professor, Department of Entomology

Corn earworm in late sweet corn continues to be a management challenge for many growers. Fall armyworm, European corn borer, and western bean cutworm can also cause damage. We will discuss how best to use insecticides and transgenic varieties to control these caterpillar pests.

1 Hour Recertification Credit – Category 3        

5B - Managing Soil-borne Strawberry Diseases in Annual Production Systems - Dr. Melanie Ivey – The Ohio State University, Assistant Professor, Department of Plant Pathology

Soil-borne diseases are key constraints to sustainable strawberry production in Ohio. Annual plasticulture-based production and new everbearing strawberry varieties have enabled strawberry farmers in Ohio to produce and market throughout the summer and into the late fall.  The effect of annual production systems on soil-borne diseases and management of these diseases will be discussed.

1 Hour Recertification Credit – Category 3 

5C - Optimizing Pollination While Still Protecting Your Pollinators in Special Crop Production - Amanda Bennett – Ohio State University Extension Educator, Miami County

Pollination is vital to specialty crop production. Learn best management practices that maximize pollinator effectiveness while still protecting them from your pest management strategies.

1 Hour Recertification Credit – Core

 

Ohio Private Pesticide Applicator Credits

Licensed Ohio pesticide applicators with a private license can obtain recertification credits during this conference. Every three years, applicators must obtain at least 3 hours of training with at least one hour of Core and at least 30 minutes of training for each additional category on their license. Licensed applicators can receive training throughout the three years of the cycle, as long as they meet the total training requirements before their license expires.

Bring your license to the conference. Ohio State University Extension will be set-up to check your recertification status and can let you know how much training you still need to recertify your pesticide applicator license.